Something Weird

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Assassin Of Youth, the third major marijuana film of the 1930s, borrowed its title from an article written by Harry Anslinger, the head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, who succeeded in criminalizing the drug in 1937. Assassin of Youth, along with Marijuana and Reefer Madness, convinced the public that dope turned kids into sex crazed murderers. And with the evidence so compellingly presented here, who could doubt it?
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The same year that producer-director LAURENCE MERRICK made the oddball vampire film Guess What Happened to Count Dracula, he also unleashed Black Angels, a loopy yet cynical biker flick about a white motorcycle gang vs. a black motorcycle gang that’s jam packed with absurdities, semi-authenticities, and even some ass-kickin’ action. (The film also opens with a chase scene so hilariously sped up that it makes the entire world look like...Read More
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Delinquents! Drugs! Interracial Violence! RITA MORENO! DYAN CANNON! And - yipes! - Topless Sex Scenes! Yes, kiddies, here's another excellent ·but­ forgotten B-movie, full of racial tension and a couple of big name stars, turned into Sixties Sexploitation via nudie-movie inserts. The mind-boggling end result is that you're hearing dialogue like "No black monkey's going to play around with my sister!" one minute, then seeing giggling g...Read More
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From director IRVIN S. YEAWORTH, the man who made The Blob, 4-D Man, and Dinosaurus, comes the “True-Life Story” of Fred Garland, a liquor-lovin’ producer, talent agent, swindler, and “complete bum” who gets hooked on heroin and ends up becoming… a preacher! Shot in 1952 as Twice Convicted, the film was eventually transformed into The Flaming Teenage when additional non-Yeaworth footage was added of Teenage Alcoholics making damn fool...Read More
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Something happened alright! It was like a bolt of cultural lightning that split the decade - and America itself - in two. It was a radical change In music, fashions, sensibtlity and politics that separated and polarized generations. It was the birth of Add Culture, Free Love, and the Anti-War Movement. It was sex and drugs and sitar, flower power, free clinics, and freakouts. It was The Hippie Revolt, and It's all captured here, baby....Read More
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"Organized narcotics traffic is big business, and to get to the top, you've got to go to the bottom!" says sourpuss Lt. Lacey (a particularly dour, soon-to-be-dead PAUL KELLY) in this wonderfully lurid cross between a JD flick, Reefer Madness, and Dragnet from the pre-rock-'n'-roll be-bob bleakness of the 1950s, in which the search for a teenage junkie uncovers a small town festering with high-school hipsters eager to get Hooked.
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"Let's have no discussion of violence aboard the vessel," says love-child-turned-thug Daisy (JEREMY SLATE) to a Cuban drug smuggler moments before Daisy gets him high, and then shoots him in the gut with a spear gun. This happens in the first few minutes of The Hooked Generation and effortlessly sets the tone for what follows as director WILLIAM GREFE - the man who previously let a mutant jellyfish man (Sting of Death, '66) and an Ind...Read More
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Here’s an odd but nonetheless fascinating time capsule of late- Sixties social unrest filtered through the mind of Florida-based sexploitation producer-director HARRY KERWIN. Yup, the man who made Strange Rampage, My Third Wife George, and Girls Come Too - and who was also the brother of Blood Feast star Bill Kerwin ­ wanted to tap into the same youth market companies Like AlP were so good at exploiting. But lacking the funds to make ...Read More
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"War babies. They want to be different. They don't want to belong to any mass society. They have their own-type clubs, their own 'in' groups." Thus Malamondo, an elegant look at early-Sixties' teenage angst and "way out youth," Euro-style, set to the delirious musical musings of a young ENNIO MORRICONE! "Teenage swingers" ski in the nude in the Swiss Alps! (Skinny-skiing?) At a summer resort in Italy, "the children of the post-war ...Read More
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During the golden age of the roadshow, no exploiteer returned to the drug theme more often that DWAIN ESPER. After the infamous short Sinister Menace and the feature-length Narcotic (both 1933), Esper and his screenwriter wife, HILDAGARDE STADIE, unleashed Marihuana, the first of the famous trilogy of anti-pot films of the 1930's which included Reefer and Assassin of Youth. Esper delivered on his promise to show "weird orgies, wil...Read More
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After releasing the exploitation, sexploitation, and even kiddie films of one-man film-industry BARRY MAHON, Something Weird has finally found one of his two "lost" rock movies, Musical Mutiny starring IRON BUTTERFLY, a wacky little hippie fantasy which hasn’t been seen since its theatrical release way back in 1970. And, of course, with Mr. Mahon at the helm, it's also the most minimalist rock movie ever made complete with a plot of s...Read More
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Of all the filmmakers who toiled in the world of exploitation, no one made films as consistently rude, offensive, and jaw-droppingly outrageous as roadshow pioneer DWAIN ESPER, the man who made Maniac (1934) and Marijuana (1936). Written by Mrs. Esper, HILDEGARDE STADIE (who allegedly based the main character on an opium-smoking uncle), and filled with enough plot for a dozen exploitation movies, Narcotic claims to be dedicated to "Th...Read More
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Fans of vintage educational shorts will no doubt enjoy this feature produced by a company called Police Science, which combines elements of the juvenile delinquency and classroom-scare genres, and presents them in the manner of a police training film. Sternly narrated by ART GILMORE (and re-released in 1962 as The Dread Persuasion), The Narcotic Story chronicles the life of Joyce, a former "hype" -- classic drug slander for a user -- ...Read More
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Bikers, beach parties, body painting, death by dune buggy, interracial lust, and a good old-fashioned catfight all gleefully collide in Savages from Hell, the manic followup to Shanty Tramp from producer K. GORDON MURRAY and director JOSE ("Joseph") PRIETO. And while Savages ain’t no Shanty — hell, few films are — it’s still an exuberant blast from Florida’s past which manages to make the entire Sunshine State seem like one of those s...Read More
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“The Film That’s Scorchin’ The Nation’s Screens!” The She who Shoulda Said ‘No’! is honeypot LILA LEEDS (Lady in the Lake, Moonrise) who was busted for doing doobies with rugged Robert Mitchum just months before this updated upgrade of Reefer Madness. Cashing in on the notoriety of “The Screen’s Newest Blonde Bomb,” KROGER BABB, “America’s Fearless Showman,” promoted the film as “The Story of Lila Leeds and Her Expose of the Ma...Read More
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Before he became known for distributing such drive-­in epics as I Drink Your Blood, I Eat Your Skin, and I Spit on Your Grave, JERRY GROSS directed two fascinating little quickies - Girl on A Chain Gang (’65) and Teenage Mother (’67) - that are textbook examples of classic old-school exploitation. In fact. shot­-on-Long-Island Teenage Mother seems to take its inspiration from a half dozen old roadshow films, updated for the Sixties, a...Read More
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Beatniks? What beatniks? Two-bit punks, a closet rock-&-roll star, and an out-of-his-mind psycho: yes. Beatniks: no. Though The Beatniks was probably a last-minute title change to replace a less exploitable moniker, it didn’t make much of a difference to the audiences of 1960. After all, to a world emerging from the Eisenhower era, bohemian artists and beat-generation poets were seen as little more than socially maladjusted misfits in...Read More
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Simply put, it's male bikers vs. female bootleggers. And if that ain’t a perfect example of drive-in-style High Concept, nothing is! With a cast that reads like a Who’s Who of Sixties exploitation. The Girls from Thunder Strip is also one of the very first films to exploit the biker craze that came in the wake of German’s The Wild Angels the same year. But in the hands of director DAVID L HEWITT (who would dazzle the world three years...Read More
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It’s not often one gets to see a cinematic Sex Goddess of the Forties wallowing in Sixties drug culture, but that’s exactly what happens when Miss Columbia Pictures, RITA HAYWORTH herself, enters The Naked Zoo. And, yup, it’s quite a spectacle.
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Originally titled Electric Shades of Grey (the on-screen title of SWV's pristine print), The Psychedelic Priest is a real rarity from the tail end of the hippie movement. According to cinematographer (and unbilled co-director) WILLIAM GREFE, the producer raised the film's budget by promoting trading stamps (!), and the shooting schedule demanded a certain amount of improvisation, because the amount of script that had actually been pre...Read More
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"Are you beat?" asks coffee-shop impresario Mr. T. "Oh, sure, man," his sleazy friend Sid replies."Cool, way out, and long gone, dad!" Actually, although they’re right in the middle of Beatsville U.S.A. - complete with beat poets, chess games, bongo-and-flute music, and beatnik babes in black leotards - they’re both phonies. Sidney - played by instantly-recognizable character actor NED GLASS (the guy who’s always sneezing in Charade) ...Read More
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Hippies! Incest! High-School Hookers! Drug parties! lesbians! Free-love! Suicide! And. .. well, psychiatry. Put it all together - with an especially heavy hand - and you’ve got The Wild Scene, a cinematic stew of sex and sociology that gleefully exploits the most overused phrase of the late-sixties," the generation gap" ("It’s more than a gap, it’s a void") with a variety of lurid case studies ....